What Animals Can Teach Us About Human Health

What Animals Can Teach Us About Human Health

New research shows that about 60 percent of all human diseases are zoonotic, meaning they can be transmitted between animals and humans. However, physicians and veterinarians rarely work together. Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and journalist Kathryn Bowers wrote a book about the extraordinary opportunities that exist in cross-disciplinary collaboration in the medical profession. They spoke to Sam Litzinger about the possibilities.

New research shows that about 60 percent of all human diseases are zoonotic, meaning they can be transmitted between animals and humans. However, physicians and veterinarians rarely work together. Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and journalist Kathryn Bowers wrote a book about the extraordinary opportunities that exist in cross-disciplinary collaboration in the medical profession. They spoke to Sam Litzinger about the possibilities. New York Times science reporter Benedict Carey has information about new research in which primate intelligence was enhanced via the use of a special brain implant. The procedure is being considered for application in human patients suffering from brain ailments. Also featured: BirdNote, our weekly exploration of living things with wings.

Music: “Animal Dreams” by Bob James

Comments

Please familiarize yourself with our Code of Conduct and Terms of Use before posting your comments.

In Linnaeus's original scheme, the animals were one of three kingdoms, divided into the classes of Vermes, Insecta, Pisces, Amphibia, Aves, and Mammalia. Since then the last four have all been subsumed into a single phylum, the Chordata, whereas the various other forms have been separated out. -Douglas Andrew

February 28, 2013 - 8:22pm
The Animal House is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.